WORKSHOP Exploring methodologies: ethnography of culture- and memory-making in the city

Exploring methodologies: ethnography of culture- and memory-making in the city

WORKSHOP WITH PROFESSOR SHARON MACDONALD
24th of February, 2-4:30pm S0.13 Strand Building, Strand Campus King’s College London, Strand, London, WC2R 2LS

This is the second workshop out of three in a workshop series on methodologies and interdisciplinarity organized by the Cultural Memory Studies Reading Group of KCL’s Culture, Media and Creative Industries (CMCI) and German Department. The event is funded by the KCL’s Faculty of Arts and Humanities through the Small Grant for Research in the Arts and Humanities scheme (Group Events Grant) and KISS DTC.

Professor Sharon Macdonald will start the workshop with an introductory talk about undertaking ethnographic research in museums and sites of heritage-making. This will include consideration of a multi-researcher collaborative ethnography in Berlin – a city in which there are numerous and often politically contentious museums and heritage developments taking place. This contains questions of whose memories become inscribed in the cityscape and for the future. In preparation for the talk and the following discussion, the participants will be asked to read two articles which will be distributed in advance.
In the second part of the workshop, PG students will have an opportunity to present their own research related to the broader topic of heritage, museums and collective memory. Presentations can take up to ten minutes, and they will be followed by a response from Professor Macdonald and a discussion involving all participants.There are still places available for those who would like to present. If you are interested in presenting during the workshop, please let us know by the 5th of February at kclmemorygroup@gmail.com
If you would like to participate in the workshop, email the Reading Group at kclmemorygroup@gmail.com to reserve a place. Number of places is limited, please register by the 20th of February the latest.
Tea, coffee and snacks will be provided during the workshop.

Evening lecture
The workshop will be followed by Professor’s Macdonald evening lecture at 5pm: “Colonial Legacies and Cosmo-optimal futures: dilemmas and potentials of ethnographic museums”. For more information check the previous post on the blog.

Professor Sharon Macdonald is Alexander von Humboldt Professor of Social Anthropology in the Institute of European Ethnology, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin and Anniversary Professor of Cultural Anthropology at the University of York. In Berlin, she directs CARMAH, the Centre for Anthropological Research on Museums and Heritage and the research programme Making Differences in Berlin: Transforming Museums and Heritage in the 21st Century. She also directs the Contentious Collections work-package of the Horizon 2020 TRACES (Transmitting Contentious Cultural Heritage with the Arts) project and directs the Profusion theme of the Heritage Futures Project (2015-2019) funded by AHRC. Her recent publications include Memorylands: Heritage and Identity in Europe Today (2013) and the International Handbooks in Museum Studies (2015).

Colonial Legacies and Cosmo-optimal futures: dilemmas and potentials of ethnographic museums. lecture by Professor Macdonald

Colonial Legacies and Cosmo-optimal futures: dilemmas and potentials of ethnographic museums

Lecture by PROFESSOR SHARON MACDONALD
24th of February, 5-6:30pm
Followed by a wine reception

S-1.27 Strand Building, Strand Campus King’s College London, Strand, London, WC2R 2LS
The lecture will look at the struggle that ethnographic museums today face as they address their colonial legacies. Drawing on a range of examples and debates, Sharon Macdonald will identify some of the dilemmas that such museums face and examples that highlight their potential for contributing to more cosmo-optimal futures.

Number of places is limited, please email kclmemorygroup@gmail.com by 20th of February to register.

The lecture will be preceded by a workshop with Professor Macdonald “Exploring methodologies: ethnography of culture- and memory-making in the city”.

This lecture is part of an event series on methodologies and interdisciplinary organized by the Cultural Memory Studies Reading Group of KCL’s Culture, Media and Creative Industries (CMCI) and German Department. The event is funded by the KCL’s Faculty of Arts and Humanities through the Small Grant for Research in the Arts and Humanities scheme (Group Events Grant) and KISS DTC.

Professor Sharon Macdonald is Alexander von Humboldt Professor of Social Anthropology in the Institute of European Ethnology, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin and Anniversary Professor of Cultural Anthropology at the University of York. In Berlin, she directs CARMAH, the Centre for Anthropological Research on Museums and Heritage and the research programme Making Differences in Berlin: Transforming Museums and Heritage in the 21st Century. She also directs the Contentious Collections work-package of the Horizon 2020 TRACES (Transmitting Contentious Cultural Heritage with the Arts) project and directs the Profusion theme of the Heritage Futures Project (2015-2019) funded by AHRC. Her recent publications include Memorylands: Heritage and Identity in Europe Today (2013) and the International Handbooks in Museum Studies (2015).

Workshop: Memory of Atrocities in the Digital Age’– 2nd of December 2016, (Friday) 2-5 pm

 

KCL, Waterloo Campus, FWB 2.81

This event is part of a workshop series on methodologies and interdisciplinarity in exploring ‘Transnational Memory in the 21st Century’ organised by the Cultural Memory Studies Reading Group of King’s Culture, Media and Creative Industries and German Department. The first workshop is possible thanks to KISS-DTC funding.

Dr Matthew Boswell (University of Leeds) will open the workshop with an introductory lecture on ‘Holocaust Memory in the Digital Age’. Dr Boswell will discuss how the proliferation of digital technologies has impacted collective Holocaust memory and what the potential of these technologies is for institutional Holocaust memory once the survivors have passed away.

After Dr Boswell’s lecture, Dima Nashawi, MA student from the Department of Culture, Media and Creative Industries, will present her research/storytelling project related to the broader topic of ‘Memory of Atrocities in the Digital Age’ (please see abstract below). The presentation will be followed by a response from Dr Boswell and a discussion open to all participants.

Tea/coffee and snacks will be provided during the workshop.

Dima Nashawi (Department of Culture, Media and Creative Industries, KCL) – abstract

A Pursuit of Light: Visual transmission of hidden stories in the Syrian conflict 

This project revolves around transmitting the current events in the Syrian conflict to the Syrian cultural memory. A process that involves transforming the collected stories into visual/textual art interpretation and storytelling performance.

The storytelling performance is a part of an academic based project, telling stories that are similar to the traditional folk stories in Syria. The stories embody real events or facts channeled through metaphor, symbolism, and a narrative that uses fantasy as a documentation of the Syrian cultural memory.

The telling of this story has a dual purpose. By documenting the stories of people who dream about positive change, freedom and a better world, this story aims to move beyond the narrative of violence and the failed revolution, to tell the real stories of people, of Syrians who were and are survivors.  It is crucial to preserve these stories, as otherwise they will be lost to us forever, swept away within the mainstream narrative that is being constructed by the global media. Also at last, it is an invitation to support the cause of peace and the protection of civilians in Syria.

 

If you would like to attend, please email kclmemorygroup@gmail.com. We look forward to seeing you there!

 

Call for Papers: Transnational Memory in the 21st Century

Call for Papers: Transnational Cultural Memory in the 21st Century

Postgraduate Symposium at King’s College London, 23 September 2016

Keynote speakers: Stef Craps (Associate Professor, Ghent University), Joanne Garde-Hansen (Associate Professor, University of Warwick)

The production, circulation, representation and reception of cultural memory beyond borders in an increasingly globalised world are central themes brought to attention in the transcultural memory turn (Erll and Nunning 2008, de Cesari and Rigney 2014). Academics in social sciences and humanities explore how memories are circulated, mediated and disintegrated through transcultural and transnational processes. What is the role of media in bringing about or assisting this transcultural memory turn? How can we approach the complex and controversial concepts of transnationalism and globalisation in the digital age through the lens of cultural memory studies? The joint seminar between King’s College London and the University of Leeds will explore the relevance of transnational cultural memory theories and methodological approaches in the 21st Century, with a particular focus on digital technologies, by inviting researchers at various stages of their career (PhD students, faculty) interested in cultural memory studies.

In the academic year 2015/2016 postgraduate students from KCL and other London-based universities have come together in the interdisciplinary Cultural Memory Reading Group of King’s Culture, Media and Creative Industries and the German Department. The group’s discussed selected key texts in cultural memory studies and considered their relevance for their PhD projects. To conclude the series of reading group meetings, the participants invite postgraduate researchers with an interest in cultural memory to present their work in progress at the symposium “Transnational cultural memory in the 21st Century”.  The event is a collaboration with PhD students from the University of Leeds, who are working in related areas and are associated with the three-year Leverhulme Trust-funded project: ‘Traumatic Pasts, Cosmopolitanism, and Nation-Building in Contemporary World Literatures’.

The symposium will open with a keynote lecture by Joanne Garde-Hansen, Associate Professor at the University of Warwick, and conclude with a second keynote by Stef Craps, Associate Professor at Ghent University in Belgium.

We invite papers from postgraduate students who would like to present their work on cultural memory, particularly transnational memory, in a supportive and friendly environment. Each researcher will have 15 minutes to present their work, followed by feedback from a paper discussant. We particularly encourage contributions that engage with the following topics, although papers relating to other aspects of cultural memory not listed below are also welcome:

  • The politics of memory
  • Digital media and memory
  • Human rights and memory
  • Transnational and local memories
  • Diasporic and travelling memories
  • Contested memories
  • Countermemories and minority histories
  • Amnesty and amnesia

Please send an abstract (max. 300 words), and a short bio (max. 100 words) to kclmemorygroup@gmail.com by July 30th, 2016.  We will inform applicants about our selection by the first week of August. Successful applicants will be asked to submit their papers by September 15th, 2016.